Tire Pressure Related Accidents

Tire pressure related car accidents

Have you ever thought that your tire pressure could cause an accident? You see tire shreds on the highway sometimes on the way home from work and you might think, “I wonder what happened to that tire?” and also, “Where is that car that that tire belonged to?” More often than not, those cars are towed away. That may seem obvious but we have information for you that might help you avoid those situations!

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, there are 11,000 tire-related crashes in the United States every year. That’s crazy to us! Here are a few ways to prevent your tires from causing a crash.

Check for Worn Treads

Worn tire treads are a leading cause of tire-related car accidents. Worn tire treads are a major cause of failure in cars. Do you know how to check worn tire treads? Here’s an easy way to check:

Take a penny and stick it into the tread of the tire. Make sure that the face of Abraham Lincoln is facing you. Stick the penny into the tread and if you can see the whole of Lincoln’s head then you need to get your tires replaced. It is also important to check that your tires are not uneven.

Tire Pressure is Important

With newer models of cars, there is a Tire Pressure Monitoring System (TPMS). This device in your car lights up on your dashboard when one of your tires has less than desirable pressure. There are also other ways for you to gauge what your tire pressure is. There are manual pressure gauges you should keep in your car. Do a monthly tire pressure check!

While underinflation of the tires is dangerous and causes many tire-related crashes, over inflation of your tires is as dangerous. Over inflating your tires causes unnecessary wear on your tires which can cause your tires to pop. TPMS does not detect over inflation of your tires but it detects underinflation.

George Tait Law

Here at George Tait Law, we take cases involving car crashes. We are here to navigate through your car accident!

 

George Tait Law and its lawyers are not representing the parties mentioned in this article when the article was posted.  Our information source is cited in the article.